These six robotics resources can help educators introduce the subject into their classrooms

The lesser-known elements of STEM are enjoying the limelight right now, with computer science and coding moving to the top of educators’ priority lists. Robotics, too, is following suit—the subject is quickly catching on in schools across the nation as programming emerges as a way to introduce project-based learning, problem solving, and critical thinking into classrooms.

When students have fun participating in STEM subjects in the early grades, that enthusiasm remains, and keeps students engaged as the subjects get tougher in high school and college.

A number of advocacy groups and universities offer resources to help educators weave robotics into teaching and learning.

The Robotics Academy at the Carnegie Mellon Robotics Institute
The Robotics Academy is committed to using the motivational effects of robotics to excite students about science and technology. It is an educational outreach of Carnegie Mellon University.

Botball Educational Robotics Program
The Botball Educational Robotics Program engages middle and high school aged students in a team-oriented competition.

FIRST Family of Programs
The annual programs culminate in an international competition and celebration where teams win recognition, gain self-confidence, develop people and life skills, make new friends, and perhaps discover an unforeseen career path.

STEMRobotics from Portland State University
This repository is for educators or program directors seeking robotics education materials.

Robofest, from Lawrence Technological University
Robofest is a festival of competitions and events with autonomous robots that encourages students to have fun while learning principles of physical science, computer science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), and Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). Students design, construct, and program the robots.

LEGO Robotics from Texas Tech University
This website serves as a basis for teachers to create their own LEGO Robotics programs. This curriculum is designed for hands-on learning and the activities can be modified to fit any grade level. This curriculum provides teachers with a basis for incorporating project-based learning into interdisciplinary technology-driven instruction in K-12 classrooms.

Via eClassroom News

This article was featured on eClassroom News on October 15 2014 and was written by the staff of eSchool News.

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